GAAMAC Events My GAAMAC

Online

Organized By : Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect

Since it became operational in 2006, the UN Human Rights Council (HRC) has established more than 30 investigative bodies tasked with monitoring, investigating and establishing the facts and circumstances of grave abuses and violations of international human rights and humanitarian law, some of which may amount to mass atrocity crimes. Commissions of Inquiry (CoI), Fact-Finding Missions (FFM) and other investigative bodies can constitute key mechanisms to respond to the commission of atrocities and prevent their recurrence.

Investigative bodies are an important tool in upholding our Responsibility to Protect. By directly applying an “atrocity lens,” investigative mechanisms can broaden our understanding of patterns of behavior that enable the commission of genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity and ethnic cleansing. The CoI on Burundi and the FFM on Myanmar have both utilized the UN’s Framework of Analysis for Atrocity Crimes to identify risk factors and potential triggers for war crimes, crimes against humanity, ethnic cleansing or genocide. Despite these examples, the systematic inclusion of an atrocity lens in all HRC-mandated investigative bodies has yet to be achieved.

This event aims to increase understanding of how CoIs, FFMs and other mechanisms can systematically include an atrocity lens in their fact-finding and investigations and contribute to accountability, prevention and non-recurrence of atrocities. During the event previous and current members of investigative bodies will unpack lessons learned and best practices from their work.

This event is co-hosted by the Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect and the Permanent Missions of Australia, Germany, Switzerland and Uruguay.

REGISTER HERE!


Online

Organized By : Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect

What lessons can Europe learn from 15 years of R2P and atrocity prevention? How can European states integrate the principle of responsibility to protect into national domestic and foreign policies? What are the biggest triggers and risks in European countries that could lead to atrocities? What should Europe be aiming to do between now and 2035, when R2P is 30?

Marking the 15th anniversary of R2P, Karen Smith, the UN Special Adviser of the Secretary-General on the Responsibility to Protect, Savita Pawnday, Deputy Executive Director at the Global Centre on the Responsibility to Protect, and Kate Ferguson, Co-Executive Director at Protection Approaches, will join in conversation to discuss these pressing questions about the future and relevance of Responsibility to Protect for Europe.

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Online

Organized By : Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect

Since it was established 75 years ago, the United Nations has had a mixed record in terms of its capacity to prevent atrocities and protect populations from conscience shocking crimes. During 2009, as the war in Sri Lanka was coming to a close, government forces and rebels of the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam perpetrated war crimes and crimes against humanity. A UN internal review panel, headed by Charles Petrie, determined that the UN had systematically failed to protect populations from the crimes. Nearly a decade later, Ambassador Gert Rosenthal conducted a similar review of the UN’s presence in Myanmar during the so-called “clearance operations” in Rakhine State and the years leading up to the genocide of the Rohingya.

On 19 November the Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect will bring together these two renowned UN experts to discuss their seminal reports on Sri Lanka and Myanmar, and lessons learned regarding UN responses to situations where populations are facing the threat of atrocity crimes. Drawing on their unique expertise, Ambassador Rosenthal and Mr. Petrie will discuss the findings of their reports and assess their systemic implications for the UN. Is the UN effective in responding to escalating atrocity risks? Are there any political, structural, or institutional challenges that inhibit the UN’s effectiveness? Is there a need to improve early action within the UN system?

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Online

Organized By : Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect

This year the international community celebrates the 75th anniversary of the United Nations as well as the 15th anniversary of the adoption of the principle of the Responsibility to Protect at the 2005 World Summit. While these coinciding anniversaries deserve to be widely celebrated, they also come at a turbulent and unprecedented time. The COVID-19 pandemic has reinforced the need for solutions that embrace multilateralism, defend global norms and standards, and uphold international law.

This virtual event, co-hosted by the governments of Costa Rica, Denmark and Qatar, offers Member States the unique opportunity to reaffirm the global commitment to protect vulnerable populations, to take stock of past efforts and best practices with regard to the prevention of atrocities, and to devise effective strategies for ‘Building Back Better’ after the COVID-19 pandemic.

Statement on the 15th Anniversary of R2P

-United Nations Secretary-General, H.E. Mr. António Guterres (video message)

Opening statements:

-Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs of the State of Qatar,

-H.E. Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman bin Jassim Al- Thani

-Minister for Foreign Affairs of Costa Rica, H.E. Mr. Rodolfo Solano Quirós

-Minister for Foreign Affairs of Denmark, H.E. Mr. Jeppe Kofod

For more information about the event and to register, please contact Ms. Juliette Paauwe at the Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect at jpaauwe@globalr2p.org.


Online

Organized By : Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect

Gross human rights violations often serve as early warning signs of situations that may escalate into atrocity crimes. Yet, not all human rights crises indicate such an imminent risk, nor do all of them necessarily result in the commission of genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity or ethnic cleansing.The Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect will host an interactive conversation with four leading human rights and mass atrocity experts to examine how and why some human rights crises escalate, why some identity-based conflicts reach a critical tipping point, and what lessons can be learned about how to protect human rights and prevent atrocities.

Panelists:
-Andrew Gilmour, Former Assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights and Head of OHCHR in New York
-Rita Iszák-Ndiaye, Rapporteur of the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination CERD
-Yasmin Sooka, Chair of the UN Commission on Human Rights in South Sudan
-Castro Wesamba, Chief of Office of the UN Office on Genocide Prevention and the Responsibility to Protect